The Differentiation of Rat Oligodendroglial Cells Is Highly Influenced by the Oxygen Tension: In Vitro Model Mimicking Physiologically Normoxic Conditions.

Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Jan 24;19(2). pii: E331. doi: 10.3390/ijms19020331.

Janowska J1, Ziemka-Nalecz M2, Sypecka J3.

1 NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 5 Pawinskiego Street, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland. Ten adres pocztowy jest chroniony przed spamowaniem. Aby go zobaczyć, konieczne jest włączenie w przeglądarce obsługi JavaScript..

2 NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 5 Pawinskiego Street, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland. Ten adres pocztowy jest chroniony przed spamowaniem. Aby go zobaczyć, konieczne jest włączenie w przeglądarce obsługi JavaScript..

3 NeuroRepair Department, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 5 Pawinskiego Street, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland. Ten adres pocztowy jest chroniony przed spamowaniem. Aby go zobaczyć, konieczne jest włączenie w przeglądarce obsługi JavaScript..

The Differentiation of Rat Oligodendroglial Cells Is Highly Influenced by the Oxygen Tension: In Vitro Model Mimicking Physiologically Normoxic Conditions.

ABSTRACT

Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) constitute one of the main populations of dividing cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Physiologically, OPCs give rise to mature, myelinating oligodendrocytes and confer trophic support to their neighboring cells within the nervous tissue. OPCs are known to be extremely sensitive to the influence of exogenous clues which might affect their crucial biological processes, like survival, proliferation, differentiation, and the ability to generate a myelin membrane. Alterations in their differentiation influencing their final potential for myelinogenesis are usually the leading cause of CNS dys- and demyelination, contributing to the development of leukodystrophic disorders. The evaluation of the mechanisms that cause oligodendrocytes to malfunction requires detailed studies based on designed in vitro models. Since OPCs readily respond to changes in local homeostasis, it is crucial to establish restricted culture conditions to eliminate the potential stimuli that might influence oligodendrocyte biology. Additionally, the in vitro settings should mimic the physiological conditions to enable the obtained results to be translated to future preclinical studies. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate OPC differentiation in physiological normoxia (5% O₂) and a restricted in vitro microenvironment. To evaluate the impact of the combined microenvironmental clues derived from other components of the nervous tissue, which are also influenced by the local oxygen concentration, the process of generating OPCs was additionally analyzed in organotypic hippocampal slices. The obtained results show that OPC differentiation, although significantly slowed down, proceeded correctly through its typical stages in the physiologically relevant conditions created in vitro. The established settings were also conducive to efficient cell proliferation, exerting also a neuroprotective effect by promoting the proliferation of neurons. In conclusion, the performed studies show how oxygen tension influences OPC proliferation, differentiation, and their ability to express myelin components, and should be taken into consideration while planning preclinical studies, e.g., to examine neurotoxic compounds or to test neuroprotective strategies.

KEYWORDS:

cell proliferation; culture density; hippocampal organotypic slices; myelin protein amounts; myelinogenesis; oligodendrocyte maturation myelin; oligodendrocyte progenitor cells; physiological normoxia; serum-free culture

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