Wybrane publikacje

Real-time MRI for precise and predictable intra-arterial stem cell delivery to the central nervous system.

Walczak P1, Wojtkiewicz J2, Nowakowski A3, Habich A2, Holak P4, Xu J5, Adamiak Z4, Chehade M6, Pearl MS7, Gailloud P7, Lukomska B3, Maksymowicz W8, Bulte JW9, Janowski M10.

J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2016 Sep 12. pii: 0271678X16665853. [Epub ahead of print]

 

 

Real-time MRI for precise and predictable intra-arterial stem cell delivery to the central nervous system.

    1Division of MR Research, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Cellular Imaging Section and Vascular Biology Program, Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland.

    2Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland.

    3NeuroRepair Dept, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

    4Department of Surgery and Radiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland.

    5F.M. Kirby Research Centre, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA.

    6Division of MR Research, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

    7Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

    8Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland.

    9Division of MR Research, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Cellular Imaging Section and Vascular Biology Program, Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

    10 Division of MR Research, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Cellular Imaging Section and Vascular Biology Program, Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA NeuroRepair Dept, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland Department of Neurosurgery, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland Ten adres pocztowy jest chroniony przed spamowaniem. Aby go zobaczyć, konieczne jest włączenie w przeglądarce obsługi JavaScript..

Abstract

 

Stem cell therapy for neurological disorders reached a pivotal point when the efficacy of several cell types was demonstrated in small animal models. Translation of stem cell therapy is contingent upon overcoming the challenge of effective cell delivery to the human brain, which has a volume ∼1000 times larger than that of the mouse. Intra-arterial injection can achieve a broad, global, but also on-demand spatially targeted biodistribution; however, its utility has been limited by unpredictable cell destination and homing as dictated by the vascular territory, as well as by safety concerns. We show here that high-speed MRI can be used to visualize the intravascular distribution of a superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent and can thus be used to accurately predict the distribution of intra-arterial administered stem cells. Moreover, high-speed MRI enables the real-time visualization of cell homing, providing the opportunity for immediate intervention in the case of undesired biodistribution.

 

KEYWORDS:

Intra-arterial; MRI; iron oxide; real-time; stroke